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Bone Substitutes - Possibilities and Limitations

This presentation by Professor Karl Andreas Schlegel, Munich/Germany, focusses on the various types of bone substitutes and their relevant applications. Professor Schlegel begins by explaining the historical developments behind the use of bone substitute, classifying the various materials as autogenous, allogeneic, xenogenic and alloplastic grafts. In doing so, the speaker emphasises that autogenous bone is still considered the gold standard for bone substitute because of its broad range of applications. This is due to the successful results achieved when treating non-space-making defects using autogenous bone chips. Nevertheless, the possibility of replacing autogenous grafts with alloplastic bone substitute is a long-term goal. This would enable the surgical risks associated with autografts, the long surgery times, and post-operative graft resorption to be prevented. Alloplastic bone substitute is a particularly appropriate alternative when autogenous grafts are not indicated, if sufficient autogenous material is not available, or when attempting to counteract bone resorption resulting from an autograft. Comprehensive knowledge of the material properties is extremely important in this regard. When selecting bone substitute, the attending surgeon should place considerable emphasis on factual information drawn from study evidence regarding the tendency towards new bone formation, as well as on the resorption properties of the material, its mechanical load-bearing capacity and long-term results.

Bone Substitutes - Possibilities and Limitations

This presentation by Professor Karl Andreas Schlegel, Munich/Germany, focusses on the various types of bone substitutes and their relevant applications. Professor Schlegel begins by explaining the historical developments behind the use of bone substitute, classifying the various materials as autogenous, allogeneic, xenogenic and alloplastic grafts. In doing so, the speaker emphasises that autogenous bone is still considered the gold standard for bone substitute because of its broad range of applications. This is due to the successful results achieved when treating non-space-making defects using autogenous bone chips. Nevertheless, the possibility of replacing autogenous grafts with alloplastic bone substitute is a long-term goal. This would enable the surgical risks associated with autografts, the long surgery times, and post-operative graft resorption to be prevented. Alloplastic bone substitute is a particularly appropriate alternative when autogenous grafts are not indicated, if sufficient autogenous material is not available, or when attempting to counteract bone resorption resulting from an autograft. Comprehensive knowledge of the material properties is extremely important in this regard. When selecting bone substitute, the attending surgeon should place considerable emphasis on factual information drawn from study evidence regarding the tendency towards new bone formation, as well as on the resorption properties of the material, its mechanical load-bearing capacity and long-term results.

About the expert

Prof. Dr. Dr. Karl Andreas Schlegel

Facharzt für Mund- Kiefer- Gesichtschirurgie, Plastische Operationen

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